Central Virginia Heritage (online edition), Winter 2016 Available Now

A snippet from Sam Towler’s article, “Albemarle County Chancery Cases Preservation Project”:

In the 1970s, Albemarle County sent most of the chancery cases in its files which ended before 1912 to the Library of Virginia. The Library of Virginia preserved all the cases they received and put them in acid-free folders to prevent deterioration.  With the Albemarle County Clerk’s approval, I have been working on a project to preserve the post-1900 cases that Albemarle still had at the Courthouse in Charlottesville by unfolding the documents and putting the papers in acid-free folders provided by the Clerk’s Office.

For the rest of this article, and several others, go to “Members Only” on the menu bar above, and choose “Central Virginia Heritage — Current Issue.” (Note: You have to be logged in to this website in order to see “Members Only.”)

For those who are not members, we offer the opportunity to purchase a printed copy of each issue. The Winter 2016 issue is available from CreateSpace.com/6782694 for $6.50. Click on the CreateSpace.com link above or search for “Central Virginia Heritage” on the Createspace.com Store site.

If you have trouble logging in to the site to download your copy, or if you have trouble with the CreateSpace.com site, please contact me at the webmaster link at the bottom of this page.

Table of Contents for the Winter 2016 issue:

  • Division of the Negro Property of the Estate of William Morris of Louisa County, Virginia, 1832 … page 1
  • Albemarle County Chancery Cases Preservation Project … page 4
  • Last Will and Testament of Benjamin Franklin, of St. Anne’s Parish, Albemarle Co., VA … page 6
  • Early Broadus Wood High School History … page 7
  • The Wyatt Family of Albemarle County, Virginia … page 9
  • Reductions in Service at the Library of Virginia … page 11
  • The Times-Dispatch Genealogical Column: The Walker Family of Virginia … page 12
  • Castle Hill … page 16
  • James Govan Estate Settlement and Division of Slaves (1831-1835), Hanover Co., VA … page 18
  • List of the Hire of Negroes [of the Heirs of] Richard Terrell of Louisa Co., VA (1771) … page 19
  • Funeral Home Records Available Online … page 20
  • Letter from Edward Govan to Mary Govan Hill, near Fredericksburg, VA (1831) … page 22
  • Slaves of John Ambler (April 1829) at his Plantations in Amherst and Louisa Counties … page 23
  • President’s Column, by Patricia Lukas … page 24

P.S. Wouldn’t you like to see your research published in this beautiful magazine? Send it to any of the CVGA officers on the About CVGA page.

Central Virginia Heritage (online edition), Fall 2016 Available Now

Cover of Central Virginia Heritage, Fall 2016 issue.

Here is a snippet from Patricia Lukas’ article “Hill & Wood Funeral Service Records:
A Brief Overview”:

The business now known as Hill & Wood Funeral Service was founded in 1907 as the Irving, Way, Hill Company. Mr. Willard Irving handled the livery business, Mr. C.T. Way was a carriage maker, and J. Hercules Hill was the undertaker. It was located at Water and Main Streets. After one relocation, the business was moved to its present location at 201 N. First Street, Charlottesville, VA in 1936.

The company was incorporated as Hill and Irving in 1929. Mr. Paul H. Wood assumed the presidency in 1975 when a new corporation named Hill and Irving Funeral Home, Inc. was formed. Hill and Wood Funeral Service, Inc. became the name of the firm on January 1, 1978.

The earliest records held by the company date from August 1914. The first book consists of preprinted pages with the record of services provided …

For the rest of this article, and several others, go to “Members Only” on the menu bar above, and choose “Central Virginia Heritage — Current Issue.” (Note: You have to be logged in to this website in order to see “Members Only.”)

For those who are not members, we offer the opportunity to purchase a printed copy of each issue. The Fall 2016 issue is available from CreateSpace.com/6549428 for $6.50. Click on the CreateSpace.com link above or search for “Central Virginia Heritage” on the Createspace.com Store site.

If you have trouble logging in to the site to download your copy, or if you have trouble with the CreateSpace.com site, please contact me at the webmaster link at the bottom of this page.

Table of Contents for Fall 2016 issue:

  • Excerpts from A Census of Pensioners for Revolutionary or Military Services … page 1
  • Burial Records of Jewish Cemeteries in Central Virginia … page 5
  • Thomas M. Appling (1 Jan 1832-ca. 22 Aug. 1862) … page 6
  • Hill & Wood Funeral Service Records: A Brief Overview … page 7
  • Genetic Genealogy in Practice: Book Announcement … page 8
  • Pension Testimony from Veterans of the American Revolution in Albemarle County … page 9
  • The Pension Act of 1818 … page 13
  • An 18th-Century Pre-Nuptial Agreement from Fluvanna County … page 14
  • Three Lists of Negro Slaves Owned by Lewis Holladay of Bellefonte, Spotsylvania County, Va., 1800-1817 … page 19
  • Spotsylvania County, Va. Tax Assessments, 1779-1780 … page 20
  • Central Virginia Historical Organizations … page 24
  • President’s Column, by Patricia Lukas … page 27

Family Stories Survey

One of the things that I’ve observed as I talk to people about their family histories is that there are certain “tropes” that appear over and over again. By tropes, I’m talking about common themes or stories that are the same from family to family. Some examples of these tropes are:

  • “three brothers came from the Old World”
  • “my family is descended from royalty or nobility”
  • “one of my ancestors is an Indian princess”
  • “one of my ancestors ran moonshine”

I am interested in finding out more about these family stories, and the first step is to collect the stories told by a wide range of families, and analyze the data. So, I have compiled a survey for you to complete if you wish, to tell me about the stories that your family tells.

If you wish to complete the survey, click on this link: Family Stories Survey and tell us your stories!

Jean L. Cooper
Webmaster, CVGA Website

THE GREAT THANKSGIVING LISTEN

What is the first step in doing genealogical research? Look anywhere and you will find this advice, “Start with what you and your living relatives know.” Sitting down together with friends and family for Thanksgiving dinner gives many of us a rare opportunity to reminisce about our lives. When dinner is over, sit in a quiet corner with an older person and record a conversation using the StoryCorps app on your smartphone.

Yes, I know, many of you who are reading this are the ‘older person’ and you might not even own a smartphone, but read on. The Great Thanksgiving Listen was designed as a learning tool for students 13 and older to record and preserve the stories and voices of older relatives. It’s all about listening. If you have a teenager in your family, they might have already heard about this project from their history teacher but anyone can participate. If the person being interviewed agrees, the recording will be saved to the StoryCorps archives at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.

Go to thegreatlisten.org to read about the project, download the app, and

“Help StoryCorps archive the wisdom of generations.” 

An Important Indexing Project

Have you heard of ‘The Freedmen’s Bureau Project’? The Freedmen’s Bureau was established after the Civil War to help enslaved people transition into free citizens.
 
FamilySearch International, in partnership with the National Archives and Records Administration, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society and the California African American Museum, has launched this initiative to index this wealth of information as quickly as possible. They are looking for as many volunteers as possible. You do not have to commit to any specific amount of time or names.
 
Go to discoverfreedmen.org to view a video explaining the project and see how easy it is to register with FamilySearch to start indexing these important records.

 

Madison County (VA) Chancery Court Records Scanned

The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce that digital images for Madison County (Va.) Chancery Causes, 1794-1912, are now available online through the Chancery Records Index <http://www.virginiamemory.com/collections/chancery/> on LVA’s Virginia Memory <http://www.virginiamemory.com/> website. Chancery cases are useful when researching local history, genealogical information, and land or estate divisions. They are a valuable source of local, state, social, and legal history and serve as a primary source for understanding a locality’s history. Read more about the collection at:

http://www.virginiamemory.com/blogs/out_of_the_box/2015/02/18/madison-county-chancery-causes-online/

Handy Forms for Researching Deeds at the Courthouse

Before you take that trip to the courthouse to research your ancestor’s property history, have a look at this: Land Records elements. It contains definitions of terms used in deeds, and describes the types of land records you might encounter.

When you’re ready to go, print out a few copies of this handy form and take them along: Abstract of Deed. The prompts will better your chances of walking out of the courthouse with all the information you need.

Making History: Transcribe Launches Today! — Library of Virginia

The Library of Virginia officially launches its new transcription project today! Check it out here: http://www.virginiamemory.com/transcribe

You can read more about the project over on Out of the Box (the Library of Virginia’s blog): http://www.vamem.com/maj

The current project centers on the Civil War 150 Legacy Project. Thousands of documents were scanned, but transcription of the documents is slow because of the lack of people to do it. The LVA seeks to harness the power of crowd sourcing to solve this problem, as they have done with the Virginia Chronicle website.

In the coming weeks and months, Transcribe will become a part of the larger umbrella called “Making History” — a new home to user engagement efforts. “We’ll be watching how things progress and start working toward the approval process for completed transcriptions, adding content to DigiTool where that’s an option, and adding more content to Transcribe.”

Feel free to publicize the project to your friends and acquaintances. The LVA will be using #TranscribeTuesday on social media to regularly advertise the project and recruit volunteers.